PS4 and Xbox One: Should You Dive In?

by ps3iso on October 29, 2013

With just under a month until the next generation of consoles hits, I’ve been getting a bit more excited to have something shiny and new in my gaming setup in the form of a PS4. The thing is, I’m not quite sure why. There’s only really a handful of games I’m wanting to play, and of those there’s only two that are exclusively on the new machines, being Resogun and Killzone.

Last week, however, this wasn’t the case. I was really excited to see Watch Dogs running on the new consoles, along with Driveclub’s PS+ edition rounding out some game time for a couple of months. The delays to both of these titles has undoubtedly been a blow to Sony’s launch plans, with Watch Dogs being a heavily co-marketed title for the PS4. Microsoft’s lineup certainly looks like it’ll be able to fill the shelves in GAME with discs more effectively than Sony’s, but overall the amount of titles for both consoles seems fairly even, thanks to the downloadable indie and free-to-play lineup on the PS4.

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Of course, launch lineups for consoles are rarely home to the best titles on the system (Super Mario 64 being the glaring exception from the list, with a personal soft spot being held for SSX on the PS2), and the hardware is always at its most expensive in the first few months. I’ve said in the past few days that if my console wasn’t already paid off (thanks to a number of donations for my birthday this year), I’d probably be holding off on pulling the trigger on next-gen. However, in spite of this view, I’ve been an early adopter for the past 2 console cycles, and I’m still really excited to be getting some shiny new tech at the end of November.

Of course, there’s a load of big titles that will be available on all systems coming up, and those of us who want to play the best possible console versions will go for a next-gen machine. High end PCs will always be ahead of the dedicated consoles, but that has always been the case. Early adopters will no doubt be keeping their current consoles to sit alongside any new purchases, and with a few games coming out in the next few months for the current machines, it’s not going to be like there’s nothing to play. I also have a rather large current-gen backlog to get through, so when the almost inevitable “next gen drought” comes along, it’s going to be interesting to get back to a few titles that I really should’ve finished by now on the PS3 and 360. With the delayed titles hitting in the early part of next year as well as Titanfall’s release being confirmed for March 13th, it’s certainly looking like there will be a steady trickle of games, unlike the anemic lineup the Wii U faced for its first few months.

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Ultimately though, the question still remains. Should you delve into the new generation early? Chances are, if you’re asking yourself this question, you’ve probably missed the chance. With the PS4 being sold out until a few weeks after launch, and only a smattering of Xbox One “Day One” console bundles still at retailers, it’s a bit late in the day to decide if you’re going to be an early adopter! If the lure of a new bit of kit under the TV is too strong, and you’ve got the money spare, why not go for it and jump into the next generation? If you’ve got to seriously consider whether it’s affordable though, I’d recommend holding off until probably around March next year. Launch games will be cheaper, and there’ll be a multitude of newer titles out with a lot more range to cover. With some of the more inflammatory rumours that have surfaced this week regarding the resolution of a number of Xbox One titles, it looks like it’s going to pay to sit on the sidelines and watch the early adopters fight it out across gaming sites and forums until the inevitable price drops down the line.

Are you all dipping in to get a PS4 and/or Xbox One at launch, waiting for the prices to drop, or just holding out for a specific game to land? Let us know below!

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